All about fake emails or websites

How to spot fake, fraudulent, spoof, or phishing emails
How do I report potential fraud, spoof or unauthorized transactions to PayPal?
How do I report a fake PayPal email or website?
How do I check the status of my spoof claim?
Scams on Craigslist and other classifieds websites

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How to spot fake, fraudulent, spoof, or phishing emails
You may receive an email falsely claiming to be from PayPal. Sending fake emails is called "phishing" because the sender is "fishing" for your personal information. The goal is to trick you in to giving up your personal, financial, or account information. Phishing emails may ask you to visit a fake or "spoof" website, or call a fake customer service number. These emails can also contain attachments that install malicious software on your computer when opened.

Keep in mind that receiving a fake email doesn't mean your account has been compromised. If you think an email is fake, don't open it. Don't reply to the email, click any links, or download any attachments. If you clicked on any links are or unsure, log in to your PayPal account and check your recent activity to make sure everything looks right.

It's also important to report the fake email or website to PayPal as soon as possible. That way, we can help protect you and other PayPal members. Forward any suspicious email to spoof@paypal.com then, delete the suspicious email.

When you aren't sure if you can trust an email claiming to be from PayPal, here are a few guidelines that can help you spot the real from the fake:

Impersonal, generic greetings are used; such as “Dear user” or “Dear [your email address]”.
Emails from PayPal will always address you by your first and last names or by your business name. We never say things like "Dear user" or "Hello PayPal member".

Ask you to click on links that take you to a fake website.
If there's a link in an email, always check it before you click. A link could look perfectly safe like www.paypal.com/SpecialOffers. Make sure to move your mouse over the link to see the true destination. If you aren’t certain, don’t click on the link. Just visiting a bad website could infect your machine.

Contain unknown attachments.
Don't ever open an attachment unless you're sure it's legitimate and safe. Be particularly cautious of invoices from companies and contractors you're not familiar with. Some attachments contain viruses that install themselves when opened.

Convey a false sense of urgency.
Phishing emails are often alarmist, warning that your account needs to be updated immediately. They're hoping you'll fall for their sense of urgency and ignore warning signs that it's fake.
If there is an urgent need for you to complete something on your account, you can find this information by logging in to your PayPal account.

The following are some common scams where fraudsters use spoofed emails. When in doubt, always log in to your PayPal account and view the Resolution Center for any notifications.

"Your account is about to be suspended."
Many fraudsters send spoofed emails warning that an account is about to be suspended, and that the account holder must enter their password in a (spoofed) webpage. PayPal will never ask you to enter your password unless you're on the login page. Report any suspect email by forwarding it to spoof@paypal.com.

"You've been paid."
Some fraudsters try to trick you in to thinking that you've received a payment for an order. They want what you're selling for free. Before you ship anything, log in to your PayPal account and check that you were actually paid.

"You have been paid too much."
Fraudsters may try to convince you that you've been paid more than you were owed. For example, a spoofed email says that you’ve been paid $500 for a camera you listed at $300. The sender asks you to ship the camera in addition to the extra $200 you were “paid” by mistake. The scammer wants your camera AND your money, but hasn’t actually paid you at all.
Simply log in to your PayPal account and check that you were paid before sending anything.

If you received an email seemingly from PayPal that states you’ve received money, check to make sure the email isn't fake. Some signs:

  • The email does not address you by your first and last name.
  • The email says the money is “on hold” until you complete an action (i.e., send money through Western Union or click a link to submit a tracking number). You can easily see if you received money by logging in to your PayPal account (do not click any links within the email).  If you’ve been paid, you’ll see the payment in your account.
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How do I report potential fraud, spoof or unauthorized transactions to PayPal?

It’s extremely important to report any suspected instances of fraud. If you think your account has been compromised change your password and update your security questions right away to protect your account (we may limit what you can do on your account until you do so). Here are some types of fraudulent activity. Please follow the steps we’ve included below to report them:

  • Unauthorized activity on your PayPal account
  • Unauthorized transactions on your PayPal Debit MasterCard®
  • Fake PayPal emails or spoof websites
  • Items not received or a potential fraudulent seller


Unauthorized activity on your PayPal account

If you've received an email notification that something has been changed on your account, but you don't remember changing it, please change your password and security questions. Next, you can update any changed information, such as your email address, address, phone number, or other profile information.

If you notice a transaction that you didn’t authorize on your PayPal, bank or credit card statement, let us know right away through our Resolution Center. Some charges may appear unfamiliar but are legitimate and authorized, learn more.

  1. Go to the Resolution Center at the bottom of the page.
  2. Click Report a Problem.
  3. Select the transaction you want to dispute, and click Continue.
  4. Select “I want to report unauthorized activity.”
  5. Click Continue.
  6. Follow the instructions to finish opening your dispute.

If you can't log in to your PayPal account, follow the steps to reset your password.


Unauthorized transactions on your PayPal Debit Mastercard®

If the unauthorized transaction involves your PayPal Debit Mastercard:

  1. Go to the Resolution Center at the bottom of the page.
  2. Click Report a Problem.
  3. Select the transaction you want to dispute, and click Continue.
  4. Select “I want to report unauthorized activity.”
  5. Click Continue.
  6. Follow the instructions to finish opening your dispute.

Here's how to report your PayPal Business Debit Card lost or stolen.

  1. Click PayPal debit card under your PayPal balance.
  2. Click the card you want to report lost or stolen under "Manage my cards."
  3. Click Report this card lost or stolen card.
  4. Click Deactivate Now.


Fake PayPal emails or spoof websites

If your account is limited, we'll send you an email with the reason for the limitation. For your convenience, we always list the steps to remove the limitation in the Resolution Center under Steps to Remove Limitation.

If you received an email stating that your account is limited but don't see any steps in the Resolution Center, you may have received a fake email. Forward it to spoof@paypal.com and we’ll investigate it for you. After you send us the email, delete it from your inbox. If you clicked on any links or downloaded any attachments within the suspicious email or website, log in to your account and view your transactions. It’s also a good idea to change your password.

Items not received or a potential fraudulent seller

If you sent a payment but haven’t received what you paid for, or believe the seller to be fraudulent, you should visit our Resolution Center. We’ve developed several programs to help protect you, and opening a dispute is the first step to help get your problem resolved. Here’s how:

  1. Go to the Resolution Center.
  2. Click Report a Problem.
  3. Select the transaction you want to dispute.
  4. Click Continue.
  5. Select either I didn't receive an item I purchased or the item I received was significantly not as described or I want to report unauthorized activity, depending on the nature of your dispute.
  6. Click Continue.
  7. Follow the instructions to file your dispute.
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How do I report a fake PayPal email or website?
If you think you’ve received a suspicious email or have been directed to a fake website, forward it to spoof@paypal.com and we’ll investigate it for you. After you send us the email, delete it from your inbox. If you clicked on any links or downloaded any attachments within the suspicious email or website, log into your account and view your transactions. It’s also a good idea to change your password.
 
To report SPAM SMS messages, forward them to ‘7726’ (which is the keys for SPAM on most phones). Check with your service provider to find out if this service is supported or you can read more about the service on the GSMA website.
 
To view all your transactions and activity, log in to your PayPal account and check your recent activity. If you see any unauthorized transactions, go to the Resolution Center to report it.

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How do I check the status of my spoof claim?
Your account security is important to us. After filing a claim for unauthorized use of your PayPal account, please allow up to 10 business days for us to conduct an investigation. If the claim is decided in your favor, all unauthorized transactions and fees will be refunded to your account.

Here's how to check the status of your claim:
  1. Go to the Resolution Center.
  2. Select Cases being reviewed by PayPal from the "View" menu, or select Closed cases (last 15 days) if your case has recently been closed.
  3. Click Details next to the claim.
We'll never ask you to reveal your password. There are no exceptions to this policy. If anyone claiming to work for PayPal asks you for your password, do not provide it.

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Scams on Craigslist and other Classified Websites
Although most online transactions are safe, you should use caution when selling items on websites such as Craigslist. Unfortunately, some people using these websites make promises regarding payments through PayPal but do not follow through with the payment. Look for common warning signs that someone may be trying to scam you:
  • The buyer can’t meet in person because of a number of reasons (i.e., they are a soldier in Iraq, they are a marine biologist, etc.).
  • The buyer requested you send the item to their “shipping agent.”
  • The buyer offered you more money than you were asking.
  • The buyer asked you to send money through Western Union or MoneyGram to the “shipping agent.”
  • The buyer only sends you text messages and won’t speak to you on the phone.
  • If you received an email seemingly from PayPal that states you received money, look for these signs to see if the email is a fake:
    • The email does not  address you by your first and last name
    • The email says the money is on “hold” until you complete an action (i.e. send money through Western Union, or click a link to submit a tracking number).
  • You can easily see if you received money by logging in to your PayPal account (do not click any links within the email).  If you’ve been paid you’ll see the payment in your account.
If any of the above happens to you, end communication with the potential buyer. Always remember that craigslist and other similar sites are intended for local pick up. To learn more about how you are protected as a seller, visit the Security Center.

Please forward all suspicious emails to spoof@paypal.com.

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