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What is a chargeback, and why did I get one?

When a customer files a chargeback with their credit card issuer, it means that they’re disputing a charge and asking the card issuer for a refund.
 

A customer might file a chargeback because they:

  • Didn’t receive their item.
  • Received a damaged or defective item.
  • Don’t recognize a credit card charge.
  • Were charged more than once for something.
  • Didn’t authorize a payment.

If you receive a chargeback, we’ll let you know. If you don’t agree that the chargeback is valid, you can help us dispute it by providing information about the transaction in the Resolution Center.
 

A chargeback isn’t the same as a PayPal claim. The chargeback process is initiated outside of PayPal, between the card issuer and their cardholder. In a dispute over a chargeback, the decision is ultimately made by the card issuer and we don't decide the outcome.

To find out how you can avoid chargebacks, see the PayPal Chargeback Guide.

Here’s how:

  1. Log in to your PayPal account.
  2. Click Resolution Center near the top of the page.
  3. Click Understanding chargebacks under "Tips and education".
Chargebacks happen when your customer disagrees with a credit card charge and asks the credit card company for a refund.
 
Customers initiate chargebacks for a variety of reasons:
  • An item is different from its description or is defective.
  • An item hasn’t been received.
  • A credit card charge isn’t recognized.
  • A payment is processed multiple times.
  • A payment is unauthorized.
We know that chargebacks can be frustrating, so we suggest you review the PayPal Chargeback Guide for information on minimizing or avoiding chargebacks. Here’s how:
  1. Go to the PayPal website and log in to your PayPal account.
  2. Click Security at the bottom of the page.
  3. Click the More about safer selling link under Selling Safely.
  4. Click Chargeback Guide.

When a customer files a chargeback with their credit card issuer, it means that they’re disputing a charge and asking the card issuer for a refund.
 

A customer might file a chargeback because they:

  • Didn’t receive their item.
  • Received a damaged or defective item.
  • Don’t recognize a credit card charge.
  • Were charged more than once for something.
  • Didn’t authorize a payment.

If you receive a chargeback, we’ll let you know. If you don’t agree that the chargeback is valid, you can help us dispute it by providing information about the transaction in the Resolution Center.
 

A chargeback isn’t the same as a PayPal claim. The chargeback process is initiated outside of PayPal, between the card issuer and their cardholder. In a dispute over a chargeback, the decision is ultimately made by the card issuer and we don't decide the outcome.

To find out how you can avoid chargebacks, see the PayPal Chargeback Guide.

Here’s how:

  1. Log in to your PayPal account.
  2. Click Resolution Center near the top of the page.
  3. Click Understanding chargebacks under "Tips and education".

When a customer files a chargeback with their credit card issuer, it means that they’re disputing a charge and asking the card issuer for a refund.
 

A customer might file a chargeback because they:

  • Didn’t receive their item.
  • Received a damaged or defective item.
  • Don’t recognize a credit card charge.
  • Were charged more than once for something.
  • Didn’t authorize a payment.

If you receive a chargeback, we’ll let you know. If you don’t agree that the chargeback is valid, you can help us dispute it by providing information about the transaction in the Resolution Center.
 

A chargeback isn’t the same as a PayPal claim. The chargeback process is initiated outside of PayPal, between the card issuer and their cardholder. In a dispute over a chargeback, the decision is ultimately made by the card issuer and we don't decide the outcome.

To find out how you can avoid chargebacks, see the PayPal Chargeback Guide.

Here’s how:

  1. Log in to your PayPal account.
  2. Click Resolution Center near the top of the page.
  3. Click Understanding chargebacks under "Tips and education".

When a customer files a chargeback with their credit card issuer, it means that they’re disputing a charge and asking the card issuer for a refund.
 

A customer might file a chargeback because they:

  • Didn’t receive their item.
  • Received a damaged or defective item.
  • Don’t recognize a credit card charge.
  • Were charged more than once for something.
  • Didn’t authorize a payment.

If you receive a chargeback, we’ll let you know. If you don’t agree that the chargeback is valid, you can help us dispute it by providing information about the transaction in the Resolution Center.
 

A chargeback isn’t the same as a PayPal claim. The chargeback process is initiated outside of PayPal, between the card issuer and their cardholder. In a dispute over a chargeback, the decision is ultimately made by the card issuer and we don't decide the outcome.

To find out how you can avoid chargebacks, see the PayPal Chargeback Guide.

Here’s how:

  1. Log in to your PayPal account.
  2. Click Resolution Center near the top of the page.
  3. Click Understanding chargebacks under "Tips and education".

When a customer files a chargeback with their credit card issuer, it means that they’re disputing a charge and asking the card issuer for a refund.
 

A customer might file a chargeback because they:

  • Didn’t receive their item.
  • Received a damaged or defective item.
  • Don’t recognize a credit card charge.
  • Were charged more than once for something.
  • Didn’t authorize a payment.

If you receive a chargeback, we’ll let you know. If you don’t agree that the chargeback is valid, you can help us dispute it by providing information about the transaction in the Resolution Center.
 

A chargeback isn’t the same as a PayPal claim. The chargeback process is initiated outside of PayPal, between the card issuer and their cardholder. In a dispute over a chargeback, the decision is ultimately made by the card issuer and we don't decide the outcome.

To find out how you can avoid chargebacks, see the PayPal Chargeback Guide.

Here’s how:

  1. Log in to your PayPal account.
  2. Click Security and Protections at the top of the page.
  3. Click Resolve a Problem with a Sale near the bottom of the page.
  4. Click read our comprehensive guide in the Chargebacks section.

When a customer files a chargeback with their credit card issuer, it means that they’re disputing a charge and asking the card issuer for a refund.
 

A customer might file a chargeback because they:

  • Didn’t receive their item.
  • Received a damaged or defective item.
  • Don’t recognize a credit card charge.
  • Were charged more than once for something.
  • Didn’t authorize a payment.

If you receive a chargeback, we’ll let you know. If you don’t agree that the chargeback is valid, you can help us dispute it by providing information about the transaction in the Resolution Center.
 

A chargeback isn’t the same as a PayPal claim. The chargeback process is initiated outside of PayPal, between the card issuer and their cardholder. In a dispute over a chargeback, the decision is ultimately made by the card issuer and we don't decide the outcome.

To find out how you can avoid chargebacks, see the PayPal Chargeback Guide.

Here’s how:

  1. Log in to your PayPal account.
  2. Click Security and Protections at the top of the page.
  3. Click Resolve a Problem with a Sale near the bottom of the page.
  4. Click read our comprehensive guide in the Chargebacks section.

When a customer files a chargeback with their credit card issuer, it means that they’re disputing a charge and asking the card issuer for a refund.
 

A customer might file a chargeback because they:

  • Didn’t receive their item.
  • Received a damaged or defective item.
  • Don’t recognize a credit card charge.
  • Were charged more than once for something.
  • Didn’t authorize a payment.

If you receive a chargeback, we’ll let you know. If you don’t agree that the chargeback is valid, you can help us dispute it by providing information about the transaction in the Resolution Center.
 

A chargeback isn’t the same as a PayPal claim. The chargeback process is initiated outside of PayPal, between the card issuer and their cardholder. In a dispute over a chargeback, the decision is ultimately made by the card issuer and we don't decide the outcome.

To find out how you can avoid chargebacks, see the PayPal Chargeback Guide.

Here’s how:

  1. Log in to your PayPal account.
  2. Click Security Center at the top of the page.
  3. Click Safer Selling on the left side of the page.
  4. Click Tips to Sell Securely, then click Chargeback Guide.

When a customer files a chargeback with their credit card issuer, it means that they’re disputing a charge and asking the card issuer for a refund.
 

A customer might file a chargeback because they:

  • Didn’t receive their item.
  • Received a damaged or defective item.
  • Don’t recognize a credit card charge.
  • Were charged more than once for something.
  • Didn’t authorize a payment.

If you receive a chargeback, we’ll let you know. If you don’t agree that the chargeback is valid, you can help us dispute it by providing information about the transaction in the Resolution Center.
 

A chargeback isn’t the same as a PayPal claim. The chargeback process is initiated outside of PayPal, between the card issuer and their cardholder. In a dispute over a chargeback, the decision is ultimately made by the card issuer and we don't decide the outcome.

To find out how you can avoid chargebacks, see the PayPal Chargeback Guide.

Here’s how:

  1. Log in to your PayPal account.
  2. Click Resolution Center near the top of the page.
  3. Click Understanding chargebacks under "Tips and education".

When a customer files a chargeback with their credit card issuer, it means that they’re disputing a charge and asking the card issuer for a refund. Click here to see a video all about chargebacks.

 

A customer might file a chargeback because they:

  • Didn’t receive their item.
  • Received a damaged or defective item.
  • Don’t recognize a credit card charge.
  • Were charged more than once for something.
  • Didn’t authorize a payment.

If you receive a chargeback, we’ll let you know. If you don’t agree that the chargeback is valid, you can help us dispute it by providing information about the transaction in the Resolution Center.
 

A chargeback isn’t the same as a PayPal claim. The chargeback process is initiated outside of PayPal, between the card issuer and their cardholder. In a dispute over a chargeback, the decision is ultimately made by the card issuer and we don't decide the outcome.

PayPal charges a fee to the seller when the buyer files a chargeback with his/her credit card issuer. If the transaction is protected by Seller Protection Policy, PayPal will cover the amount of the chargeback and waive the chargeback fee. You can view the chargeback fee and process in the User Agreement.

To find out how you can avoid chargebacks, see the PayPal Chargeback Guide.

Here’s how:

  1. Log in to your PayPal account.
  2. Click Resolution Center near the top of the page.
  3. Click Understanding chargebacks under "Tips and education".

When a customer files a chargeback with their credit card issuer, it means that they’re disputing a charge and asking the card issuer for a refund.
 

A customer might file a chargeback because they:

  • Didn’t receive their item.
  • Received a damaged or defective item.
  • Don’t recognize a credit card charge.
  • Were charged more than once for something.
  • Didn’t authorize a payment.

If you receive a chargeback, we’ll let you know. If you don’t agree that the chargeback is valid, you can help us dispute it by providing information about the transaction in the Resolution Center.
 

A chargeback isn’t the same as a PayPal claim. The chargeback process is initiated outside of PayPal, between the card issuer and their cardholder. In a dispute over a chargeback, the decision is ultimately made by the card issuer and we don't decide the outcome.

To find out how you can avoid chargebacks, see the PayPal Chargeback Guide.

Here’s how:

  1. Log in to your PayPal account.
  2. Click Resolution Center near the top of the page.
  3. Click Understanding chargebacks under "Tips and education".
Chargebacks happen when your customer disagrees with a credit card charge and asks the credit card company for a refund.

When a customer files a chargeback with their credit card issuer, it means that they’re disputing a charge and asking the card issuer for a refund.
 

A customer might file a chargeback because they:

  • Didn’t receive their item.
  • Received a damaged or defective item.
  • Don’t recognize a credit card charge.
  • Were charged more than once for something.
  • Didn’t authorize a payment.

If you receive a chargeback, we’ll let you know. If you don’t agree that the chargeback is valid, you can help us dispute it by providing information about the transaction in the Resolution Center.
 

A chargeback isn’t the same as a PayPal claim. The chargeback process is initiated outside of PayPal, between the card issuer and their cardholder. In a dispute over a chargeback, the decision is ultimately made by the card issuer and we don't decide the outcome.

PayPal charges a fee to the seller when the buyer files a chargeback with his/her credit card issuer. If the transaction is protected by Seller Protection Policy, PayPal will cover the amount of the chargeback and waive the chargeback fee. You can view the chargeback fee and process in the User Agreement.

To find out how you can avoid chargebacks, see the PayPal Chargeback Guide.

Here’s how:

  1. Log in to your PayPal account.
  2. Click Resolution Center near the top of the page.
  3. Click Understanding chargebacks under "Tips and education".
Chargebacks happen when your customer disagrees with a credit card charge and asks the credit card company for a refund.

When a customer files a chargeback with their credit card issuer, it means that they’re disputing a charge and asking the card issuer for a refund.
 

A customer might file a chargeback because they:

  • Didn’t receive their item.
  • Received a damaged or defective item.
  • Don’t recognize a credit card charge.
  • Were charged more than once for something.
  • Didn’t authorize a payment.

If you receive a chargeback, we’ll let you know. If you don’t agree that the chargeback is valid, you can help us dispute it by providing information about the transaction in the Resolution Center.
 

A chargeback isn’t the same as a PayPal claim. The chargeback process is initiated outside of PayPal, between the card issuer and their cardholder. In a dispute over a chargeback, the decision is ultimately made by the card issuer and we don't decide the outcome.

PayPal charges a fee to the seller when the buyer files a chargeback with his/her credit card issuer. If the transaction is protected by Seller Protection Policy, PayPal will cover the amount of the chargeback and waive the chargeback fee. You can view the chargeback fee and process in the User Agreement.

To find out how you can avoid chargebacks, see the PayPal Chargeback Guide.

Here’s how:

  1. Log in to your PayPal account.
  2. Click Resolution Center near the top of the page.
  3. Click Understanding chargebacks under "Tips and education".
Chargebacks happen when your customer disagrees with a credit card charge and asks the credit card company for a refund.

When a customer files a chargeback with their credit card issuer, it means that they’re disputing a charge and asking the card issuer for a refund.
 

A customer might file a chargeback because they:

  • Didn’t receive their item.
  • Received a damaged or defective item.
  • Don’t recognize a credit card charge.
  • Were charged more than once for something.
  • Didn’t authorize a payment.

If you receive a chargeback, we’ll let you know. If you don’t agree that the chargeback is valid, you can help us dispute it by providing information about the transaction in the Resolution Center.
 

A chargeback isn’t the same as a PayPal claim. The chargeback process is initiated outside of PayPal, between the card issuer and their cardholder. In a dispute over a chargeback, the decision is ultimately made by the card issuer and we don't decide the outcome.

PayPal charges a fee to the seller when the buyer files a chargeback with his/her credit card issuer. If the transaction is protected by Seller Protection Policy, PayPal will cover the amount of the chargeback and waive the chargeback fee. You can view the chargeback fee and process in the User Agreement.

To find out how you can avoid chargebacks, see the PayPal Chargeback Guide.

Here’s how:

  1. Log in to your PayPal account.
  2. Click Resolution Center near the top of the page.
  3. Click Understanding chargebacks under "Tips and education".

Chargebacks happen when your customer disagrees with a credit card charge and asks the credit card company for a refund.

 

Customers initiate chargebacks for a variety of reasons:

  • An item is different from its description or is defective.
  • An item hasn’t been received.
  • A credit card charge isn’t recognized.
  • A payment is processed multiple times.
  • A payment is unauthorized.

We know that chargebacks can be frustrating, so we suggest you review the PayPal Chargeback Guide for information on minimizing or avoiding chargebacks. Here’s how:

  1. Go to the PayPal website.
  2. Click Security at the bottom of the page.
  3. Click the More about safer selling link under ‘Selling Safely.’
  4. Click Resolving Issues for Sellers in the ‘Security Centre’ box on the left.
  5. Click Chargeback Guide under ‘Resolving Issues for Sellers.

 

What is Buyer Abuse?
 

PayPal takes action against buyers with a history of abusing our policies. This includes buyers who may be filing dishonest or excessive disputes, claims, chargebacks, or bank transfer returns.

We offer buyers purchase protection for the following:

  • Unauthorized account access and use
  • Items not received from the seller
  • Items significantly not as described

However, our purchase protection does not currently cover buyer remorse or issues not listed above that buyers may experience with their purchases.

If you suspect that you are being targeted by a buyer while the case is open, please send us as much information as possible about any related transactions and why you think the buyer may be at fault.

If the case has already been closed, you can appeal the decision on your claim and specifically reference “buyer abuse” as the reason for the appeal.

In both of these cases, we recommend you provide more objective evidence of abuse. While we cannot promise action based on an isolated event, documented and repeated incidences of abuse that multiple parties can attest to provides us with stronger and more defensible justification to take action against a buyer. Due to privacy regulations, we cannot provide you with direct feedback about actions taken against any other PayPal accountholders, inclusive of abusive buyers you may have interacted with in the past, but your input and participation is highly valued.

Providing objective evidence about dishonest practices that buyers use, particularly evidence that can be corroborated helps us improve the quality of our buyers and promotes greater trust and safety when transacting with us.

PayPal takes action against buyers with a history of abusing our policies. This includes buyers who may be filing dishonest or excessive disputes, claims, chargebacks, or bank transfer returns.

We offer buyers purchase protection for the following:

  • Unauthorized account access and use
  • Items not received from the seller
  • Items significantly not as described

However, our purchase protection does not currently cover buyer remorse or issues not listed above that buyers may experience with their purchases.

If you suspect that you are being targeted by a buyer while the case is open, please send us as much information as possible about any related transactions and why you think the buyer may be at fault.

If the case has already been closed, you can appeal the decision on your claim and specifically reference “buyer abuse” as the reason for the appeal.

In both of these cases, we recommend you provide more objective evidence of abuse. While we cannot promise action based on an isolated event, documented and repeated incidences of abuse that multiple parties can attest to provides us with stronger and more defensible justification to take action against a buyer. Due to privacy regulations, we cannot provide you with direct feedback about actions taken against any other PayPal accountholders, inclusive of abusive buyers you may have interacted with in the past, but your input and participation is highly valued.

Providing objective evidence about dishonest practices that buyers use, particularly evidence that can be corroborated helps us improve the quality of our buyers and promotes greater trust and safety when transacting with us.

PayPal takes action against buyers with a history of abusing our policies. This includes buyers who may be filing dishonest or excessive disputes, claims, chargebacks, or bank transfer returns.

We offer buyers purchase protection for the following:

  • Unauthorized account access and use
  • Items not received from the seller
  • Items significantly not as described

However, our purchase protection does not currently cover buyer remorse or issues not listed above that buyers may experience with their purchases.

If you suspect that you are being targeted by a buyer while the case is open, please send us as much information as possible about any related transactions and why you think the buyer may be at fault.

If the case has already been closed, you can appeal the decision on your claim and specifically reference “buyer abuse” as the reason for the appeal.

In both of these cases, we recommend you provide more objective evidence of abuse. While we cannot promise action based on an isolated event, documented and repeated incidences of abuse that multiple parties can attest to provides us with stronger and more defensible justification to take action against a buyer. Due to privacy regulations, we cannot provide you with direct feedback about actions taken against any other PayPal accountholders, inclusive of abusive buyers you may have interacted with in the past, but your input and participation is highly valued.

Providing objective evidence about dishonest practices that buyers use, particularly evidence that can be corroborated helps us improve the quality of our buyers and promotes greater trust and safety when transacting with us.

PayPal takes action against buyers with a history of abusing our policies. This includes buyers who may be filing dishonest or excessive disputes, claims, chargebacks, or bank transfer returns.

We offer buyers purchase protection for the following:

  • Unauthorized account access and use
  • Items not received from the seller
  • Items significantly not as described

However, our purchase protection does not currently cover buyer remorse or issues not listed above that buyers may experience with their purchases.

If you suspect that you are being targeted by a buyer while the case is open, please send us as much information as possible about any related transactions and why you think the buyer may be at fault.

If the case has already been closed, you can appeal the decision on your claim and specifically reference “buyer abuse” as the reason for the appeal.

In both of these cases, we recommend you provide more objective evidence of abuse. While we cannot promise action based on an isolated event, documented and repeated incidences of abuse that multiple parties can attest to provides us with stronger and more defensible justification to take action against a buyer. Due to privacy regulations, we cannot provide you with direct feedback about actions taken against any other PayPal accountholders, inclusive of abusive buyers you may have interacted with in the past, but your input and participation is highly valued.

Providing objective evidence about dishonest practices that buyers use, particularly evidence that can be corroborated helps us improve the quality of our buyers and promotes greater trust and safety when transacting with us.

PayPal takes action against buyers with a history of abusing our policies. This includes buyers who may be filing dishonest or excessive disputes, claims, chargebacks, or bank transfer returns.

We offer buyers purchase protection for the following:

  • Unauthorized account access and use
  • Items not received from the seller
  • Items significantly not as described

However, our purchase protection does not currently cover buyer remorse or issues not listed above that buyers may experience with their purchases.

If you suspect that you are being targeted by a buyer while the case is open, please send us as much information as possible about any related transactions and why you think the buyer may be at fault.

If the case has already been closed, you can appeal the decision on your claim and specifically reference “buyer abuse” as the reason for the appeal.

In both of these cases, we recommend you provide more objective evidence of abuse. While we cannot promise action based on an isolated event, documented and repeated incidences of abuse that multiple parties can attest to provides us with stronger and more defensible justification to take action against a buyer. Due to privacy regulations, we cannot provide you with direct feedback about actions taken against any other PayPal accountholders, inclusive of abusive buyers you may have interacted with in the past, but your input and participation is highly valued.

Providing objective evidence about dishonest practices that buyers use, particularly evidence that can be corroborated helps us improve the quality of our buyers and promotes greater trust and safety when transacting with us.

PayPal takes action against buyers with a history of abusing our policies. This includes buyers who may be filing dishonest or excessive disputes, claims, chargebacks, or bank transfer returns.

We offer buyers purchase protection for the following:

  • Unauthorized account access and use
  • Items not received from the seller
  • Items significantly not as described

However, our purchase protection does not currently cover buyer remorse or issues not listed above that buyers may experience with their purchases.

If you suspect that you are being targeted by a buyer while the case is open, please send us as much information as possible about any related transactions and why you think the buyer may be at fault.

If the case has already been closed, you can appeal the decision on your claim and specifically reference “buyer abuse” as the reason for the appeal.

In both of these cases, we recommend you provide more objective evidence of abuse. While we cannot promise action based on an isolated event, documented and repeated incidences of abuse that multiple parties can attest to provides us with stronger and more defensible justification to take action against a buyer. Due to privacy regulations, we cannot provide you with direct feedback about actions taken against any other PayPal accountholders, inclusive of abusive buyers you may have interacted with in the past, but your input and participation is highly valued.

Providing objective evidence about dishonest practices that buyers use, particularly evidence that can be corroborated helps us improve the quality of our buyers and promotes greater
trust and safety when transacting with us.


PayPal takes action against buyers with a history of abusing our policies. This includes buyers who may be filing dishonest or excessive disputes, claims, chargebacks, or bank transfer returns.

We offer buyers purchase protection for the following:

  • Unauthorized account access and use
  • Items not received from the seller
  • Items significantly not as described

However, our purchase protection does not currently cover buyer remorse or issues not listed above that buyers may experience with their purchases.

If you suspect that you are being targeted by a buyer while the case is open, please send us as much information as possible about any related transactions and why you think the buyer may be at fault.

If the case has already been closed, you can appeal the decision on your claim and specifically reference “buyer abuse” as the reason for the appeal.

In both of these cases, we recommend you provide more objective evidence of abuse. While we cannot promise action based on an isolated event, documented and repeated incidences of abuse that multiple parties can attest to provides us with stronger and more defensible justification to take action against a buyer. Due to privacy regulations, we cannot provide you with direct feedback about actions taken against any other PayPal accountholders, inclusive of abusive buyers you may have interacted with in the past, but your input and participation is highly valued.

Providing objective evidence about dishonest practices that buyers use, particularly evidence that can be corroborated helps us improve the quality of our buyers and promotes greater trust and safety when transacting with us.


What if a buyer does not receive an item I sent? How can I prove that I sent it?

One way to show proof is to use a carrier with online tracking. For transactions involving merchandise worth up to the coverage amount (or the equivalent in the currency of the transaction) or more, keep an online receipt in the form of a signature from the recipient as proof of shipment.

To view the specific terms and conditions, click Legal Agreements or User Agreement at the bottom of the page.

One way to show proof is to use a carrier with online tracking. For transactions involving merchandise worth up to the coverage amount (or the equivalent in the currency of the transaction) or more, keep an online receipt in the form of a signature from the recipient as proof of shipment.

To view the specific terms and conditions, click Legal Agreements or User Agreement at the bottom of the page.

One way to show proof is to use a carrier with online tracking. For transactions involving merchandise worth up to the coverage amount (or the equivalent in the currency of the transaction) or more, keep an online receipt in the form of a signature from the recipient as proof of shipment.

To view the specific terms and conditions, click Legal Agreements or User Agreement at the bottom of the page.

One way to show proof is to use a carrier with online tracking. For transactions involving merchandise worth 250USD or more, keep an online receipt in the form of a signature from the recipient as proof of shipment.

To view the specific terms and conditions, click Legal Agreements or User Agreement at the bottom of the page.

One way to show proof is to use a carrier with online tracking. For transactions involving merchandise worth up to the coverage amount (or the equivalent in the currency of the transaction) or more, keep an online receipt in the form of a signature from the recipient as proof of shipment.

To view the specific terms and conditions, click Legal Agreements or User Agreement at the bottom of the page.

One way to show proof is to use a carrier with online tracking. For transactions involving merchandise worth up to the coverage amount (or the equivalent in the currency of the transaction) or more, keep an online receipt in the form of a signature from the recipient as proof of shipment.

To view the specific terms and conditions, click Legal Agreements or User Agreement at the bottom of the page.

One way to show proof is to use a carrier with online tracking. For transactions involving merchandise worth up to the coverage amount (or the equivalent in the currency of the transaction) or more, keep an online receipt in the form of a signature from the recipient as proof of shipment.

To view the specific terms and conditions, click Legal Agreements or User Agreement at the bottom of the page.

One way to show proof is to use a carrier with online tracking. For transactions involving merchandise worth up to the coverage amount (or the equivalent in the currency of the transaction) or more, keep an online receipt in the form of a signature from the recipient as proof of shipment.

To view the specific terms and conditions, click Legal Agreements or User Agreement at the bottom of the page.

One way to show proof is to use a carrier with online tracking. For transactions involving merchandise worth up to the coverage amount (or the equivalent in the currency of the transaction) or more, keep an online receipt in the form of a signature from the recipient as proof of shipment.

To view the specific terms and conditions, click Legal Agreements or User Agreement at the bottom of the page.

One way to show proof is to use a carrier with online tracking. For transactions involving merchandise worth up to the coverage amount (or the equivalent in the currency of the transaction) or more, keep an online receipt in the form of a signature from the recipient as proof of shipment.

To view the specific terms and conditions, click Legal Agreements or User Agreement at the bottom of the page.

One way to show proof is to use a carrier with online tracking. If you can provide a tracking number we can confirm online that your item has been delivered. For transactions involving merchandise worth 1,000 ILS (or the equivalent in the currency of the transaction) or more, keep an online receipt in the form of a signature from the recipient as proof of shipment.

To view the specific terms and conditions, click Legal Agreements or User Agreement at the bottom of the page.

One way to show proof is to use a carrier with online tracking. For transactions involving merchandise worth 250USD or more, keep an online receipt in the form of a signature from the recipient as proof of shipment.

To view the specific terms and conditions, click Legal Agreements or User Agreement at the bottom of the page.

One way to show proof is to use a carrier with online tracking. For transactions involving merchandise worth up to the coverage amount (or the equivalent in the currency of the transaction) or more, keep an online receipt in the form of a signature from the recipient as proof of shipment.

To view the specific terms and conditions, click Legal Agreements or User Agreement at the bottom of the page.

One way to show proof is to use a carrier with online tracking. For transactions involving merchandise worth up to the coverage amount (or the equivalent in the currency of the transaction) or more, keep an online receipt in the form of a signature from the recipient as proof of shipment.

To view the specific terms and conditions, click Legal Agreements or User Agreement at the bottom of the page.

One way to show proof is to provide proof of delivery. To obtain this information, you’ll need to use a shipping company with online tracking. For transactions involving merchandise worth $250USD or more, include proof of the recipient’s signature to confirm delivery.

To view the specific terms and conditions, click Legal Agreements at the bottom of the PayPal webpage.

 

I didn’t receive the item I purchased or it’s different from the description.

The best way to resolve a transaction problem is to communicate directly with your seller. Most sellers welcome the opportunity to work out problems and provide good customer service. If you’re unable to work things out with your seller you can report the problem in the Resolution Center.

If you purchased the item on eBay, please use the eBay Resolution Center, located at: http://resolutioncenter.ebay.com/

If you purchased the item on a site other than eBay, use the PayPal Resolution Center.

To learn more about the dispute process, go to the Resolution Center and click the How to Dispute a Transaction tutorial.

For eBay specific information, please click here and you will be directed to eBay’s customer support page.

The best way to resolve a transaction problem is to communicate directly with your seller. Most sellers welcome the opportunity to work out problems and provide good customer service. If you’re unable to work things out with your seller you can report the problem in the Resolution Center.

If you purchased the item on eBay, please use the eBay Resolution Center, located at: http://resolutioncenter.ebay.com/

If you purchased the item on a site other than eBay, use the PayPal Resolution Center.

To learn more about the dispute process, go to the Resolution Center and click the How to Dispute a Transaction tutorial.

The best way to resolve a transaction problem is to communicate directly with your seller. Most sellers welcome the opportunity to work out problems and provide good customer service. If you’re unable to work things out with your seller you can report the problem in the Resolution Center.

If you purchased the item on eBay, please use the eBay Resolution Center, located at: http://resolutioncenter.ebay.com/

If you purchased the item on a site other than eBay, use the PayPal Resolution Center.

To learn more about the dispute process, go to the Resolution Center and click the How to Dispute a Transaction tutorial.

* If you don't have a PayPal account but you've used PayPal to pay for an eBay item and haven't received it, please go to the eBay Resolution Center.

If you have trouble with a purchase, you can communicate directly with your seller by opening a dispute in our Resolution Center.

If you purchased the item on eBay, use the eBay Resolution Center. Go to eBay, hover over Customer Support at the top of the eBay page and then click Resolution Center. If you purchased the item on a site other than eBay, use the PayPal Resolution Center.

There are 2 kinds of disputes:

  • Item Not Received – You bought something but didn’t receive it. (Wait at least 3 days from the transaction date to give your seller enough time to ship the item.)
  • Significantly Not as Described – You received an item but it was significantly different from the seller’s original description. (You might have to pay return shipping costs.)
Here's how to open a dispute:

  1. Log in to your PayPal account.
  2. Click Resolution Center at the top of the page.
  3. Click Dispute a Transaction.
  4. Select Item Dispute, then click Continue.
  5. Click Find transaction ID.
  6. Click the Transaction ID next to the transaction you want to dispute, then click Continue.

Note:
  • You have 45 days from the transaction date to open a dispute.
  • If you and the seller can’t resolve the problem, you can ask us to investigate by escalating your dispute to a claim.
  • If you don’t escalate a dispute to a claim within 20 days, we automatically close it. Once a dispute is closed, you can’t reopen it or escalate it to a claim.
To learn more about the dispute process, go to the Resolution Center and click the How to Dispute a Transaction tutorial.

 

For eBay specific information, please click here and you will be directed to eBay’s customer support page.