Mobile Purchasing Trends


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Mobile Spend

In 2013, Australian mobile commerce spend was US $3,996,000,000. Between 2013 and 2016, that number is predicted to grow by 204%.

Popularity of Mobile Shopping

In the last 12 months, 33% of Australian online consumers have shopped via a smartphone and 23% have shopped via a tablet. 74% of Australian smartphone shoppers are between the ages of 18 and 34.

Buying Behaviour

Australian consumers most often engage in the following activities on their smartphones:

  • Search for product information (30%)
  • Locate/find information about a shop or business (27%)
  • Read customer or user reviews (23%)
  • Compare prices while shopping instore (21%)
  • Send money to someone else (15%)

The Future of Smartphone Shopping

Australian consumers are most interested in doing the following on their smartphones in the future:

  • Compare prices while shopping instore (14%)
  • Tap smartphone at the till to pay (e.g. using NFC) (14%)
  • Scan a barcode or QR code (14%)
  • Access shop details such as loyalty cards, vouchers, discounts, etc. (14%)
  • Order ahead (e.g. coffee or food) using an app or browser (14%)

Apps vs. Browsers

Among consumers who have purchased via both an app and a browser, apps are preferred by 47% of smartphone shoppers and 45% of tablet shoppers.
Consumers prefer apps because:

  • They are a convenient way to pay (32%)
  • They are a fast way to pay (27%)
  • They don’t need to carry or pull out a physical wallet when their details are stored (22%)

Mobile Spend

In 2013, Austrian mobile commerce spend was US $1,071,000,000. Between 2013 and 2016, that number is predicted to grow by 205%.

Popularity of Mobile Shopping

In the last 12 months, 23% of Austrian online consumers have shopped via a smartphone and 12% have shopped via a tablet. 57% of Austrian smartphone shoppers are between the ages of 18 and 34.

Buying Behaviour

Austrian consumers most often engage in the following activities on their smartphones:

  • Search for product information (36%)
  • Locate/find information about a shop or business (23%)
  • Read customer or user reviews (22%)
  • Download an app from a business where they like to shop (18%)
  • Scan a barcode or QR code (18%)

The Future of Smartphone Shopping

Austrian consumers are most interested in doing the following on their smartphones in the future:

  • Tap smartphone at the till to pay (e.g. using NFC) (13%)
  • Scan a barcode or QR code (12%)
  • Access shop details such as loyalty cards, vouchers, discounts, etc. (12%)
  • Compare prices while shopping instore (11%)
  • Order ahead (e.g. coffee or food) using an app or browser (11%)

Apps vs. Browsers

Among consumers who have purchased via both an app and a browser, apps are preferred by 43% of smartphone shoppers and 40% of tablet shoppers.
Consumers prefer apps because:

  • They are a convenient way to pay (27%)
  • They are a fast way to pay (17%)
  • They can be reminded of the option to apply offers, discounts and vouchers (16%)

Mobile Spend

In 2013, Brazilian mobile commerce spend was US $1,998,000,000. Between 2013 and 2016, that number is predicted to grow by 209%.

Popularity of Mobile Shopping

In the last 12 months, 34% of Brazilian online consumers have shopped via a smartphone and 18% have shopped via a tablet. 61% of Brazilian smartphone shoppers are between the ages of 18 and 34.

Buying Behaviour

Brazilian consumers are most interested in doing the following on their smartphones in the future:

  • Search for product information (38%)
  • Locate/find information about a shop or business (30%)
  • Read customer or user reviews (30%)
  • Compare prices while shopping instore (28%)
  • Download an app from a business where they like to shop (18%)

The Future of Smartphone Shopping

Brazilian consumers are most interested in doing the following on their smartphones in the future:

  • Order ahead (e.g. coffee or food) using an app or browser (16%)
  • Purchase from a smartphone while at home or at work (16%)
  • Tap smartphone at the till to pay (e.g. using NFC) (16%)
  • Scan a barcode or QR code (16%)
  • Use an app to make a purchase or pay a bill in a shop or business (16%)

Apps vs. Browsers

Among consumers who have purchased via both an app and a browser, apps are preferred by 46% of smartphone shoppers and 35% of tablet shoppers.
Consumers prefer apps because:

  • They are a convenient way to pay (43%)
  • They are a fast way to pay (35%)
  • They are an innovative way to pay (31%)

Mobile Spend

In 2013, Canadian mobile commerce spend was US $2,779,000,000. Between 2013 and 2016, that number is predicted to grow by 142%.

Popularity of Mobile Shopping

In the last 12 months, 19% of Canadian online consumers have shopped via a smartphone and 15% have shopped via a tablet. 52% of Canadian smartphone shoppers are between the ages of 18 and 34.

Buying Behaviour

Canadian consumers most often engage in the following activities on their smartphones:

  • Search for product information (25%)
  • Locate/find information about a shop or business (20%)
  • Read customer or user reviews (18%)
  • Compare prices while shopping instore (13%)
  • Scan a barcode or QR code (12%)

The Future of Smartphone Shopping

Canadian consumers are most interested in doing the following on their smartphones in the future:

  • Compare prices while shopping instore (17%)
  • Order ahead (e.g. coffee or food) using an app or browser (14%)
  • Scan a barcode or QR code (11%)
  • Tap smartphone at the till to pay (e.g. using NFC) (10%)
  • Access shop details such as loyalty cards, vouchers, discounts, etc. (10%)

Apps vs. Browsers

Among consumers who have purchased via both an app and a browser, apps are preferred by 46% of smartphone shoppers and 31% of tablet shoppers.
Consumers prefer apps because:

  • They are a convenient way to pay (27%)
  • They are a fast way to pay (25%)
  • They don’t need to carry or pull out a physical wallet when their details are stored (18%)

Mobile Spend

In 2013, Chinese mobile commerce spend was US $9,245,000,000. Between 2013 and 2016, that number is predicted to grow by 251%.

Popularity of Mobile Shopping

In the last 12 months, 68% of Chinese online consumers have shopped via a smartphone and 28% have shopped via a tablet. 86% of Chinese smartphone shoppers are between the ages of 18 and 34.

Buying Behaviour

Chinese consumers most often engage in the following activities on their smartphones:

  • Search for product information (49%)
  • Read customer or user reviews (38%)
  • Send money to someone else (37%)
  • Scan a barcode or a QR code (36%)
  • Purchase from a smartphone while at home or at work (33%)

The Future of Smartphone Shopping

Chinese consumers are most interested in doing the following on their smartphones in the future:

  • Use an app to make a purchase or pay a bill in a shop or business (23%)
  • Compare prices while shopping instore (22%)
  • Tap smartphone at the till to pay (e.g. using NFC) (22%)
  • Access shop details such as loyalty cards, vouchers, discounts, etc. (21%)
  • Order ahead (e.g. coffee or food) using an app or browser (19%)

Apps vs. Browsers

Among consumers who have purchased via both an app and a browser, apps are preferred by 59% of smartphone shoppers and 46% of tablet shoppers.
Consumers prefer apps because:

  • They are a convenient way to pay (65%)
  • They are a fast way to pay (47%)
  • They are easier than paying by cash or card (41%)

Mobile Spend

In 2013, Danish mobile commerce spend was US $155,000,000. Between 2013 and 2016, that number is predicted to grow by 275%.

Popularity of Mobile Shopping

In the last 12 months, 20% of Danish online consumers have shopped via a smartphone and 13% have shopped via a tablet. 61% of Danish smartphone shoppers are between the ages of 18 and 34.

Buying Behaviour

Danish consumers most often engage in the following activities on their smartphones:

  • Send money to someone else (27%)
  • Search for product information (26%)
  • Locate/find information about a shop or business (22%)
  • Scan a barcode or QR code (19%)
  • Compare prices while shopping instore (16%)

The Future of Smartphone Shopping

Danish consumers are most interested in doing the following on their smartphones in the future:

  • Tap smartphone at the till to pay (e.g. using NFC) (19%)
  • Order ahead (e.g. coffee or food) using an app or browser (16%)
  • Use an app to make a purchase or pay a bill in a shop or business (14%)
  • Compare prices while shopping instore (12%)
  • Purchase from a smartphone while on the go (e.g. while on a bus, waiting for transport) (12%)

Apps vs. Browsers

Among consumers who have purchased via both an app and a browser, apps are preferred by 36% of smartphone shoppers and 27% of tablet shoppers.
Consumers prefer apps because:

  • They are a fast way to pay (30%)
  • They are a convenient way to pay (24%)
  • They are easier than paying by cash or card (20%)

Mobile Spend

In 2013, French mobile commerce spend was US $7,125,000,000. Between 2013 and 2016, that number is predicted to grow by 180%.

Popularity of Mobile Shopping

In the last 12 months, 21% of French online consumers have shopped via a smartphone and 16% have shopped via a tablet. 56% of French smartphone shoppers are between the ages of 18 and 34.

Buying Behaviour

French consumers most often engage in the following activities on their smartphones:

  • Search for product information (20%)
  • Read customer or user reviews (15%)
  • Locate/find information about a shop or business (15%)
  • Scan a barcode or QR code (14%)

The Future of Smartphone Shopping

French consumers are most interested in doing the following on their smartphones in the future:

  • Search for product information (10%)
  • Tap smartphone at the till to pay (e.g. using NFC) (10%)
  • Scan a barcode or QR code (10%)
  • Compare prices while shopping instore (9%)
  • Locate/find information about a shop or business (8%)

Apps vs. Browsers

Among consumers who have purchased via both an app and a browser, apps are preferred by 39% of smartphone shoppers and 50% of tablet shoppers.
Consumers prefer apps because:

  • They are a convenient way to pay (21%)
  • They are a fast way to pay (20%)
  • They are an innovative way to pay (14%)

Mobile Spend

In 2013, German mobile commerce spend was US $6,465,000,000. Between 2013 and 2016, that number is predicted to grow by 210%.

Popularity of Mobile Shopping

In the last 12 months, 26% of German online consumers have shopped via a smartphone and 17% have shopped via a tablet. 60% of German smartphone shoppers are between the ages of 18 and 34.

Buying Behaviour

German consumers most often engage in the following activities on their smartphones:

  • Search for product information (30%)
  • Read customer or user reviews (23%)
  • Scan a barcode or QR code (21%)
  • Locate/find information about a shop or business (19%)
  • Compare prices while shopping instore (15%)

The Future of Smartphone Shopping

German consumers are most interested in doing the following on their smartphones in the future:

  • Search for product information (13%)
  • Tap smartphone at the till to pay (e.g. using NFC) (13%)
  • Scan a barcode or QR code (12%)
  • Order ahead (e.g. coffee or food) using an app or browser (12%)
  • Compare prices while shopping instore (11%)

Apps vs. Browsers

Among consumers who have purchased via both an app and a browser, apps are preferred by 40% of smartphone shoppers and 53% of tablet shoppers.
Consumers prefer apps because:

  • They are a convenient way to pay (30%)
  • They are a fast way to pay (23%)
  • They can instantly receive confirmation of payment (18%)

Mobile Spend

In 2013, Israeli mobile commerce spend was US $181,000,000. Between 2013 and 2016, that number is predicted to grow by 168%.

Popularity of Mobile Shopping

In the last 12 months, 37% of Israeli online consumers have shopped via a smartphone and 15% have shopped via a tablet. 51% of Israeli smartphone shoppers are between the ages of 18 and 30.

Buying Behaviour

Israeli consumers most often engage in the following activities on their smartphones:

  • Search for product information (54%)
  • Locate/find information about a shop or business (53%)
  • Compare prices while shopping instore (37%)
  • Read customer or user reviews (29%)
  • Download an app from a business where they like to shop (27%)

The Future of Smartphone Shopping

Israeli consumers are most interested in doing the following on their smartphones in the future:

  • Order ahead (e.g. coffee or food) using an app or browser (24%)
  • Tap smartphone at the till to pay (e.g. using NFC) (19%)
  • Use an app to make a purchase or pay a bill instore (17%)
  • Compare prices while shopping instore (15%)
  • Purchase from a smartphone while at home or at work (14%)

Apps vs. Browsers

Among consumers who have purchased via both an app and a browser, apps are preferred by 36% of smartphone shoppers and 36% of tablet shoppers.
Consumers prefer apps because:

  • They are a convenient way to pay (38%)
  • They don’t need to carry or pull out a physical wallet when their details are stored (35%)
  • They are a fast way to pay (33%)

Mobile Spend

In 2013, Italian mobile commerce spend was US $2,099,000,000. Between 2013 and 2016, that number is predicted to grow by 80%.

Popularity of Mobile Shopping

In the last 12 months, 36% of Italian online consumers have shopped via a smartphone and 24% have shopped via a tablet. 52% of Italian smartphone shoppers are between the ages of 18 and 34.

Buying Behaviour

Italian consumers most often engage in the following activities on their smartphones:

  • Search for product information (36%)
  • Locate/find information about a shop or business (30%)
  • Read customer or user reviews (28%)
  • Download an app from a business where they like to shop (16%)
  • Purchase from a smartphone while at home (16%)

The Future of Smartphone Shopping

Italian consumers are most interested in doing the following on their smartphones in the future:

  • Tap smartphone at the till to pay (e.g. using NFC) (20%)
  • Ordered ahead (e.g. coffee or food) using an app or browser (17%)
  • Use an app to make a purchase or pay a bill instore (15%)
  • Compare prices while shopping instore (13%)

Apps vs. Browsers

Among consumers who have purchased via both an app and a browser, apps are preferred by 53% of smartphone shoppers and 44% of tablet shoppers.
Consumers prefer apps because:

  • They are a convenient way to pay (43%)
  • They are a fast way to pay (29%)
  • They are an innovative way to pay (26%)

Mobile Spend

In 2013, Mexican mobile commerce spend was US $820,000,000. Between 2013 and 2016, that number is predicted to grow by 174%.

Popularity of Mobile Shopping

In the last 12 months, 46% of Mexican online consumers have shopped via a smartphone and 30% have shopped via a tablet. 88% of Mexican smartphone shoppers are between the ages of 18 and 34.

Buying Behaviour

Mexican consumers most often engage in the following activities on their smartphones:

  • Search for product information (49%)
  • Locate/find information about a shop or business (43%)
  • Read customer or user reviews (31%)
  • Compare prices while shopping instore (30%)
  • Download an app from a business where they like to shop (30%)

The Future of Smartphone Shopping

Mexican consumers are most interested in doing the following on their smartphones in the future:

  • Order ahead (e.g. coffee or food) using an app or browser (25%)
  • Send money to someone else (24%)
  • Scan a barcode or QR code (23%)
  • Purchase from a smartphone while at home or at work (22%)
  • Use an app to make a purchase or pay a bill in a shop or business (22%)

Apps vs. Browsers

Among consumers who have purchased via both an app and a browser, apps are preferred by 49% of smartphone shoppers and 31% of tablet shoppers.

Consumers prefer apps because:

  • They are a fast way to pay (51%)
  • They are a convenient way to pay (42%)
  • They are easier than paying by cash or card (38%)
  • They don't need to carry or pull out a physical wallet when their details are stored (38%)

Mobile Spend

In 2013, Dutch mobile commerce spend was US $1,303,000,000. Between 2013 and 2016, that number is predicted to grow by 209%.

Popularity of Mobile Shopping

In the last 12 months, 17% of Dutch online consumers have shopped via a smartphone and 15% have shopped via a tablet. 57% of Dutch smartphone shoppers are between the ages of 18 and 34.

Buying Behaviour

Dutch consumers most often engage in the following activities on their smartphones:

  • Search for product information (25%)
  • Send money to someone else (19%)
  • Locate/find information about a shop or business (16%)
  • Read customer or user reviews (14%)
  • Scan a barcode or QR code (12%)

The Future of Smartphone Shopping

Dutch consumers are most interested in doing the following on their smartphones in the future:

  • Tap smartphone at the till to pay (e.g. using NFC) (10%)
  • Compare prices while shopping instore (9%)
  • Search for product information (9%)
  • Scan a barcode or QR code (8%)
  • Access shop details such as loyalty cards, vouchers, discounts, etc. (8%)

Apps vs. Browsers

Among consumers who have purchased via both an app and a browser, apps are preferred by 54% of smartphone shoppers and 50% of tablet shoppers.

Consumers prefer apps because:

  • They are a convenient way to pay (21%)
  • They are a fast way to pay (20%)
  • They don't need to carry or pull out a physical wallet when their details are stored (11%)

Mobile Spend

In 2013, Norwegian mobile commerce spend was US $936,000,000. Between 2013 and 2016, that number is predicted to grow by 265%.

Popularity of Mobile Shopping

In the last 12 months, 24% of Norwegian online consumers have shopped via a smartphone and 16% have shopped via a tablet. 50% of Norwegian smartphone shoppers are between the ages of 18 and 34.

Buying Behaviour

Norwegian consumers most often engage in the following activities on their smartphones:

  • Locate/find information about a shop or business (25%)
  • Search for product information (23%)
  • Read customer or user reviews from their smartphone (15%)
  • Compare prices while shopping instore (14%)
  • Download an app from a business where they like to shop (14%)

The Future of Smartphone Shopping

Norwegian consumers are most interested in doing the following on their smartphones in the future:

  • Tap smartphone at the till to pay (e.g. using NFC) (16%)
  • Order ahead (e.g. coffee or food) using an app or browser (13%)
  • Compare prices while shopping instore (13%)
  • Use an app to make a purchase or pay a bill in a shop or business (13%)
  • Scan a barcode or QR code (12%)

Apps vs. Browsers

Among consumers who have purchased via both an app and a browser, apps are preferred by 32% of smartphone shoppers and 36% of tablet shoppers.

Consumers prefer apps because:

  • They are a convenient way to pay (29%)
  • They are a fast way to pay (20%)
  • They don’t need to carry or pull out a physical wallet when their details are stored (20%)

Mobile Spend

In 2013, Polish mobile commerce spend was US $471,000,000. Between 2013 and 2016, that number is predicted to grow by 134%.

Popularity of Mobile Shopping

In the last 12 months, 26% of Polish online consumers have shopped via a smartphone and 16% have shopped via a tablet. 61% of Polish smartphone shoppers are between the ages of 18 and 34.

Buying Behaviour

Polish consumers most often engage in the following activities on their smartphones:

  • Search for product information (37%)
  • Locate/find information about a shop or business (30%)
  • Read customer or user reviews (27%)
  • Compare prices while shopping instore (22%)
  • Scan a barcode or QR code (21%)

The Future of Smartphone Shopping

Polish consumers are most interested in doing the following on their smartphones in the future:

  • Tap smartphone at the till to pay (e.g. using NFC) (20%)
  • Compare prices while shopping instore (16%)
  • Purchased from a smartphone while at home or at work (15%)
  • Order ahead (e.g. coffee or food) using an app or browser (15%)
  • Purchased from a smartphone while on the go (e.g. while on a bus, waiting for transport) (14%)

Apps vs. Browsers

Among consumers who have purchased via both an app and a browser, apps are preferred by 39% of smartphone shoppers and 32% of tablet shoppers.

Consumers prefer apps because:

  • They are a convenient way to pay (46%)
  • They are a fast way to pay (39%)
  • They don’t need to carry or pull out a physical wallet when their details are stored (26%)

Mobile Spend

In 2013, Russian mobile commerce spend was US $2,338,000,000. Between 2013 and 2016, that number is predicted to grow by 109%.

Popularity of Mobile Shopping

In the last 12 months, 34% of Russian online consumers have shopped via a smartphone and 26% have shopped via a tablet. 73% of Russian smartphone shoppers are between the ages of 18 and 34.

Buying Behaviour

Russian consumers most often engage in the following activities on their smartphones:

  • Search for product information (48%)
  • Read customer or user reviews (32%)
  • Send money to someone else (26%)
  • Compare prices while shopping instore (25%)
  • Locate/find information about a shop or business (24%)

The Future of Smartphone Shopping

Russian consumers are most interested in doing the following on their smartphones in the future:

  • Tap smartphone at the till to pay (e.g. using NFC) (25%)
  • Order ahead (e.g. coffee or food) using an app or browser (22%)
  • Scan a barcode or QR code (21%)
  • Compare prices while shopping instore (19%)
  • Use an app to make a purchase or pay a bill in a shop or business (19%)

Apps vs. Browsers

Among consumers who have purchased via both an app and a browser, apps are preferred by 48% of smartphone shoppers and 56% of tablet shoppers.

Consumers prefer apps because:

  • They are a convenient way to pay (49%)
  • They are a fast way to pay (37%)
  • They simplify the payment process (27%)

Mobile Spend

In 2013, Spanish mobile commerce spend was US $1,961,000,000. Between 2013 and 2016, that number is predicted to grow by 223%.

Popularity of Mobile Shopping

In the last 12 months, 34% of Spanish online consumers have shopped via a smartphone and 23% have shopped via a tablet. 48% of Spanish smartphone shoppers are between the ages of 18 and 34.

Buying Behaviour

Spanish consumers most often engage in the following activities on their smartphones:

  • Search for product information (37%)
  • Locate/find information about a shop or business (30%)
  • Read customer or user reviews (25%)
  • Scan a barcode or QR code (21%)
  • Compare prices while shopping instore (17%)

The Future of Smartphone Shopping

Spanish consumers are most interested in doing the following on their smartphones in the future:

  • Tap smartphone at the till to pay (e.g. using NFC) (17%)
  • Use an app to make a purchase or pay a bill in a shop or business (14%)
  • Order ahead (e.g. coffee or food) using an app or browser (13%)
  • Send money to someone else from their smartphone (11%)
  • Compare prices while shopping instore (12%)

Apps vs. Browsers

Among consumers who have purchased via both an app and a browser, apps are preferred by 39% of smartphone shoppers and 35% of tablet shoppers.

Consumers prefer apps because:

  • They are a fast way to pay (36%)
  • They don’t need to carry or pull out a physical wallet when their details are stored (24%)
  • They simplify the payment process (22%)

Mobile Spend

In 2013, Swedish mobile commerce spend was US $1,097,000,000. Between 2013 and 2016, that number is predicted to grow by 252%.

Popularity of Mobile Shopping

In the last 12 months, 21% of Swedish online consumers have shopped via a smartphone and 11% have shopped via a tablet. 52% of Swedish smartphone shoppers are between the ages of 18 and 34.

Buying Behaviour

Swedish consumers most often engage in the following activities on their smartphones:

  • Search for product information (32%)
  • Locate/find information about a shop or business (22%)
  • Send money to someone else (18%)
  • Read customer or user reviews (18%)
  • Download an app from a business where they like to shop (17%)

The Future of Smartphone Shopping

Swedish consumers are most interested in doing the following on their smartphones in the future:

  • Access stored details such as loyalty cards, vouchers, discounts etc. on their smartphone (12%)
  • Tap smartphone at the till to pay (e.g. using NFC) (10%)
  • Scan a barcode or QR code (10%)
  • Order ahead (e.g. coffee or food) using an app or browser (10%)
  • Search for product information (10%)

Apps vs. Browsers

Among consumers who have purchased via both an app and a browser, apps are preferred by 39% of smartphone shoppers and 20% of tablet shoppers.

Consumers prefer apps because:

  • They are a convenient way to pay (21%)
  • They are easier than paying by cash or card (16%)
  • They can be reminded of the option to apply offers, discounts or vouchers (16%)

Mobile Spend

In 2013, Swiss mobile commerce spend was US $1,479,000,000. Between 2013 and 2016, that number is predicted to grow by 179%.

Popularity of Mobile Shopping

In the last 12 months, 32% of Swiss online consumers have shopped via a smartphone and 18% have shopped via a tablet. 55% of Swiss smartphone shoppers are between the ages of 18 and 34.

Buying Behaviour

Swiss consumers most often engage in the following activities on their smartphones:

  • Search for product information (33%)
  • Locate/find information about a shop or business (24%)
  • Scan a barcode or QR code (18%)
  • Download an app from a business where they like to shop (17%)
  • Read customer or user reviews (17%)

The Future of Smartphone Shopping

Swiss consumers are most interested in doing the following on their smartphones in the future:

  • Tap smartphone at the till to pay (e.g. using NFC) (16%)
  • Access stored details such as loyalty cards, vouchers, discounts etc. on their smartphone (13%)
  • Scan a barcode or QR code (12%)
  • Order ahead (e.g. coffee or food) using an app or browser (11%)
  • Use an app to make a purchase or pay a bill in a shop or business (11%)

Apps vs. Browsers

Among consumers who have purchased via both an app and a browser, apps are preferred by 47% of smartphone shoppers and 28% of tablet shoppers.

Consumers prefer apps because:

  • They are a convenient way to pay (28%)
  • They are a fast way to pay (22%)
  • They don’t need to carry or pull out a physical wallet when their details are stored (15%)

Mobile Spend

In 2013, Turkish mobile commerce spend was US $839,000,000. Between 2013 and 2016, that number is predicted to grow by 168%.

Popularity of Mobile Shopping

In the last 12 months, 53% of Turkish online consumers have shopped via a smartphone and 28% have shopped via a tablet. 71% of Turkish smartphone shoppers are between the ages of 18 and 34.

Buying Behaviour

Turkish consumers most often engage in the following activities on their smartphones:

  • Search for product information (46%)
  • Read customer or user reviews (40%)
  • Locate/find information about a shop or business (30%)
  • Compare prices while shopping instore (30%)
  • Purchase from a smartphone while at home or at work (26%)

The Future of Smartphone Shopping

Turkish consumers are most interested in doing the following on their smartphones in the future:

  • Tap smartphone at the till to pay (e.g. using NFC) (19%)
  • Order ahead (e.g. coffee or food) using an app or browser (19%)
  • Scan a barcode or QR code (18%)
  • Purchase from smartphone while on the go (e.g. while on a bus, waiting for transport) (17%)
  • Download an app from a business where they like to shop (17%)

Apps vs. Browsers

Among consumers who have purchased via both an app and a browser, apps are preferred by 51% of smartphone shoppers and 26% of tablet shoppers.

Consumers prefer apps because:

  • They are a convenient way to pay (52%)
  • They are a fast way to pay (48%)
  • They are easier than paying by cash or card (35%)

Mobile Spend

In 2013, Emirati mobile commerce spend was US $974,000,000. Between 2013 and 2016, that number is predicted to grow by 169%.

Popularity of Mobile Shopping

In the last 12 months, 57% of Emirati online consumers have shopped via a smartphone and 33% have shopped via a tablet. 32% of Emirati smartphone shoppers are between the ages of 18 and 30.

Buying Behaviour

Emirati consumers most often engage in the following activities on their smartphones:

  • Search for product information (41%)
  • Locate/find information about a shop or business (35%)
  • Compare prices while shopping instore (33%)
  • Read customer or user reviews (32%)
  • Purchase from a smartphone while at home or at work (24%)

The Future of Smartphone Shopping

Emirati consumers are most interested in doing the following on their smartphones in the future:

  • Purchase from a smartphone while on the go (e.g. while on a bus, waiting for transport) (21%)
  • Send money to someone else from my smartphone (21%)
  • Use an app to make a purchase or pay a bill in a shop or business (20%)
  • Order ahead (e.g. coffee or food) using an app or browser (18%)
  • Purchase from a smartphone while at home or at work (18%)

Apps vs. Browsers

Among consumers who have purchased via both an app and a browser, apps are preferred by 52% of smartphone shoppers and 31% of tablet shoppers.

Consumers prefer apps because:

  • They are a convenient way to pay (46%)
  • They are a fast way to pay (39%)
  • They are easier than paying by cash or card (34%)

Mobile Spend

In 2013, UK mobile commerce spend was US $14,607,000,000. Between 2013 and 2016, that number is predicted to grow by 152%.

Popularity of Mobile Shopping

In the last 12 months, 33% of UK online consumers have shopped via a smartphone and 23% have shopped via a tablet. 58% of UK smartphone shoppers are between the ages of 18 and 34.

Buying Behaviour

UK consumers most often engage in the following activities on their smartphones:

  • Search for product information (24%)
  • Read customer or user reviews (19%)
  • Locate/find information about a shop or business (18%)
  • Compare prices while shopping instore (16%)
  • Purchased from a smartphone while at home or at work (16%)

The Future of Smartphone Shopping

UK consumers are most interested in doing the following on their smartphones in the future:

  • Access stored details such as loyalty cards, vouchers, discounts etc. on their smartphone (12%)
  • Use an app to make a purchase or pay a bill in a shop or business (11%)
  • Compare prices while shopping instore (11%)
  • Scan a barcode or QR code (11%)
  • Tap smartphone at the till to pay (e.g. using NFC) (10%)

Apps vs. Browsers

Among consumers who have purchased via both an app and a browser, apps are preferred by 52% of smartphone shoppers and 26% of tablet shoppers.

Consumers prefer apps because:

  • They are a convenient way to pay (27%)
  • They are a fast way to pay (25%)
  • They are easier than paying by cash or card (17%)

Mobile Spend

In 2013, American mobile commerce spend was US $40,156,000,000. Between 2013 and 2016, that number is predicted to grow by 140%.

Popularity of Mobile Shopping

In the last 12 months, 31% of American online consumers have shopped via a smartphone and 23% have shopped via a tablet. 53% of American smartphone shoppers are between the ages of 18 and 34.

Buying Behaviour

American consumers most often engage in the following activities on their smartphones:

  • Search for product information (33%)
  • Locate/find information about a shop or business (27%)
  • Read customer or user reviews (27%)
  • Compare prices while shopping instore (21%)
  • Scan a barcode or QR code (19%)

The Future of Smartphone Shopping

American consumers are most interested in doing the following on their smartphones in the future:

  • Order ahead (e.g. coffee or food) using an app or browser (15%)
  • Compare prices while shopping instore (14%)
  • Tap smartphone at the till to pay (e.g. using NFC) (14%)
  • Scan a barcode or QR code (12%)
  • Access shop details such as loyalty cards, vouchers, discounts, etc. (11%)

Apps vs. Browsers

Among consumers who have purchased via both an app and a browser, apps are preferred by 45% of smartphone shoppers and 52% of tablet shoppers.

Consumers prefer apps because:

  • They are a convenient way to pay (36%)
  • They are a fast way to pay (24%)
  • They don’t need to carry or pull out a physical wallet when their details are stored (19%)

Customs and Taboos


Select Country


Country-Flags

Occasions


Back to School
02/02/2015
Valentine's Day
14/02/2015
Easter
05/04/2015
Mother's Day
10/05/2015
Epiphany
01/06/2015
Back to School
01/02/2015
Easter
05/04/2015
Mother's Day
10/05/2015
Valentine's Day
14/02/2015
Easter
05/04/2015
Mother's Day
10/05/2015
Father's Day
21/06/2015
Canada Day
01/07/2015
Hanukkah
06/12/2015-14/12/2015
Christmas
25/12/2015
Boxing Day
26/12/2015
Valentine's Day
14/02/2015
Easter
05/04/2015
Feast Day of St. Peter and St. Paul
29/06/2015
Christmas
25/12/2015
Valentine's Day
14/02/2015
Lunar New Year
19/02/2015
Lantern Festival
03/05/2015
Qingming (Tomb-sweeping Day)
05/04/2015
Mother's Day
10/05/2015
Children's Day
06/01/2015
Epiphany
12/01/2015
Easter
05/04/2015
Mother’s Day
10/05/2015
Father’s Day
21/06/2015
Días de Amor y Amistad (Valentine’s Day)
20/09/2015
CyberLunes (Cyber Monday)
30/11/2015
Christmas
25/12/2015
Epiphany
01/06/2015
Les Soldes
07/01/2015-10/02/2015
Valentine's Day
14/02/2015
Easter
05/04/2015
Mother's Day
21/05/2015
Epiphany
01/06/2015
Valentine's Day
14/02/2015
Easter
05/04/2015
Mother's Day
10/05/2015
Valentine's Day
14/02/2015
Lunar New Year
19/02/2015-21/02/2015
Mother's Day
10/05/2015
Father's Day
14/06/2015
Epiphany
01/06/2015
Valentine's Day
14/02/2015
Lunar New Year
19/02/2015
Easter
05/04/2015
Epiphany
06/01/2015
Valentine’s Day
14/02/2015
Easter
05/04/2015
Christmas
25/12/2015
Shogatsu
01/01/2015
Valentine's Day
14/02/2015
White Day
14/03/2015
Back to School
01/04/2015
Golden Week
29/04/2015-05/05/2015
Children's Day
05/05/2015
Mother's Day
10/05/2015
Day of the Holy Kings
06/01/2015
Valentine’s Day
14/02/2015
Children’s Day
30/07/2015
Mother’s Day
10/05/2015
Father’s Day
21/06/2015
All Soul’s Day
01/11/2015
Christmas
25/12/2015
Valentine’s Day
14/02/2015
King’s Day
27/04/2015
Mother’s Day
10/05/2015
Father’s Day
21/06/2015
Sinterklaas
05/12/2015
First and Second Christmas
25/12/2015-26/12/2015
Grandmother’s Day
21/01/2015
Grandfather’s Day
22/01/2015
Valentine’s Day
14/02/2015
Women’s Day
08/03/2015
Easter
05/04/2015
Mother’s Day
26/05/2015
Children’s Day
01/06/2015
Father’s Day
23/06/2015
Boyfriend’s Day
30/09/2015
St. Nicholas Day
06/12/2015
Christmas
25/12/2015
Second Christmas
07/01/2015
Valentine’s Day
14/02/2015
Defender of the Motherland Day
23/02/2015
International Women’s Day
08/03/2015
First Christmas
25/12/2015
New Year’s Eve
31/12/2015
Epiphany
01/06/2015
Valentine's Day
14/02/2015
Lunar New Year
19/02/2015
St. Joseph's Day/Father's Day
19/03/2015
Easter
05/04/2015
Mother's Day
05/03/2015
Valentine’s Day
14/02/2015
Mother’s Day
31/05/2015
Father’s Day
09/11/2015
Christmas
24/12/2015
Valentine’s Day
14/02/2015
Lunar New Year
19/02/2015-21/02/2015
Mother's Day
10/05/2015
Father's Day
08/08/2015
Chinese Valentine’s Day
20/08/2015
Back to School
01/09/2015
Mid-Autumn Festival
27/09/2015
Christmas
25/12/2015
Valentine’s Day
14/02/2015
Mother's Day
10/05/2015
Father's Day
21/06/2015
Sugar Feast
18/07/2015
Back to School
September 2015
New Year’s Eve
31/12/2015
Valentine's Day
14/02/2015
Mother's Day
15/03/2015
St. Patrick's Day
17/03/2015
Easter
05/04/2015
Father's Day
21/06/2015
Halloween
31/10/2015
Christmas
25/12/2015
Valentine's Day
14/02/2015
St. Patrick's Day
17/03/2015
Easter
05/04/2015
Mother's Day
10/05/2015
Father's Day
21/06/2015
Independence Day
04/07/2015
Halloween
31/10/2015
Thanksgiving
26/11/2015
Black Friday
27/11/2015
Cyber Monday
30/11/2015
Christmas
25/12/2015

Customs


Business gift giving is rarely expected but is considered a nice gesture. Gifts related to the person's business or hobbies are appropriate.
Australians have embraced the green movement of recycled and eco-friendly products such as reusable shopping bags; recycled paper gift cards, stationery or calendars.
Small gifts are commonly exchanged with family members, close friends and neighbours on birthdays and Christmas.
If invited to someone's home for dinner, it is polite to bring a box of chocolates or flowers to the host. A good quality bottle of wine is always appreciated.

Customs


Giving knives or scissors symbolises wanting to sever ties with the gift’s recipient.
Black and purple are colours that represent mourning, while handkerchiefs are associated with tears and funerals.

Customs


It is recommended to include both French and English translations on your business card.
If you are invited to someone’s home, it is customary to bring the host or hostess chocolates, flowers or a bottle of wine.
When receiving a gift, it is normally opened immediately in front of the gift-giver when received.
A child's birthday cake will typically be a layer cake, within the layers a wrapped coin is hidden, and the child that finds the coin is the first to get a turn at all the party games.
Children attending a Canadian birthday party may receive birthday crackers as a party favour. Birthday crackers are small cardboard tubes that are decorated with coloured paper, and when the children open them they make a popping noise and they will find a hidden treasure inside, typically a small toy or sweet.
In Quebec, sending flowers in advance of a dinner party is proper protocol.
White lilies or chrysanthemums are reserved for funerals.
It is considered impersonal to give cash or money as a gift.
Gifts are not normally exchanged in a business setting.

Customs


When invited into a home, flowers or wine are an appropriate gift to bring along.
Gifts should be more conservative than expensive.
When offering a gift, make sure that it is nicely wrapped.
Avoid objects such as knives, letter openers or scissors, as they can imply the severance of a relationship.

Customs


When purchasing gifts for friends and family during Chinese New Year, consumers pay particular attention to product packaging.
Ideally, gifts are wrapped in red paper for happy occasions, as red is a lucky colour.
For weddings, gold and silver are also appropriate gift-wrapping colours.
Gifts should be given with 2 hands.
Gifts should be refused 1 or 2 times before being accepted.
During the Spring Festival, Chinese custom prohibits the use of a broom for 3 days after New Year’s Day, so as to not sweep away the good luck the New Year brings.
Fans signify scattering or splitting up upon getting married – for example, a young woman will give her parents a fan to signify she is leaving them for her husband.
Never give a man a green hat – it insinuates his wife is cheating on him.
Do not give a gift in sets of 4 (in Cantonese, the word for “four” sounds very much like the word for “death”).
While red paper and gift-wrap is recommended, red ink is symbolic of severing ties. When signing a card or giving a pen, red ink should be avoided.

Customs


When a gift is given, the recipient should express tremendous gratitude.
It is customary for a dinner guest to bring a gift for the hostess when invited to someone’s home. Typical gifts include flowers, pastries, chocolates, fruit and nuts.
When meeting a business associate it is thoughtful to bring a gift for their children. American-made games and sweets are very popular items for these occasions, provided they are not widely available in Colombia already.
In Colombia a girl's 15th birthday is considered an important milestone. The typical gift is gold.
Wrapped gifts are not opened in public.
Avoid lilies and marigolds, as they are reserved for funerals.

Customs


When attending a party or dinner at someone’s house, never arrive empty-handed. A bottle of champagne, dessert liqueur or box of chocolates are appropriate offerings.
On 1 May, which is the French Labour Day, you should offer a small bouquet of “muguet” or Lily of the Valley, to loved ones and close friends.
If offering flowers for a dinner party host, it may be a good idea to either send them the day before, or to bring something that requires minimal arrangement, since the host may have their hands full for the evening.
Wine should generally not be offered when invited for dinner, as the host typically expects to make that decision themselves.
When giving flowers, do not give 13.
White chrysanthemums and lilies are reserved for funerals.
Red carnations represent ill will.

Customs


When arriving in a home, it is customary to bring a small gift, taking into account the occasion and the recipient.
Small gifts are polite when meeting a business contact for the first time.
Birthdays are very important in German culture. On their birthday, children expect to wake up to gifts and a birthday cake.
Pointed items such as knives, scissors or umbrellas are considered bad luck and should not be offered as wedding gifts.
For family members, money is considered very impersonal for a wedding gift.
In a relationship, shoes are an inappropriate gift as they represent the act of walking away.

Customs


Gift giving is an important practice in Hong Kong. If you receive a gift, it’s considered polite to give a gift in return.
Gifts should be accepted with both hands.
Unwrapping a gift in front of the gift giver implies that the recipient is greedy or impatient. To avoid awkwardness, gifts are usually accepted with a polite “thank you” and then set aside to be opened later.
It is an increasingly common practice for companies to send cards to business associates for Christmas as well as Lunar New Year.
When invited to a home, appropriate gifts include sweets, cookies, fruit, liquor or related gifts.
It is important to avoid excessively admiring things (for example, a decorative object in a home) as the host may feel obligated to give it to you.
For Lunar New Year, it is customary to present a gift of money in a red envelope to children and service personnel who you encounter on a regular basis. This offering is called a “hong bao.” Notes should be new and in even amounts. Many employers will give employees a “hong bao” equivalent to one month’s salary.
Giving a green hat implies that the recipient's wife is unfaithful, or that his or her sister is not honourable.
Blue should be avoided as a gift-wrapping colour as it is the colour of mourning.
Shoes are not good gifts, as they denote unhappiness and bad luck.
The Chinese word for four, sounds quite similar to the word for death in many varieties of Chinese. Special care may be taken to avoid occurrences or reminders of the number four.

Customs


Always bring a gift when invited to someone’s house for a holiday meal – this is especially true for Passover (April) and Rosh Hashanah (September). Customary gifts include decorative platters, vases, gift baskets, wine, flowers or confectionary.
The same rule applies when one is invited to a Sabbath meal – gifts and flowers are appreciated.
If you know that children will be present when invited to a home, acknowledging them with a small toy is appreciated.
For life stage events – like weddings or Bar Mitzvah – cash is the proper gift.
Gifts have a proper time and place with superstitions in mind. For example, no baby showers are held, and no items are bought for babies before they are born. The best etiquette is to have a gift delivered a couple of weeks after the baby is born.

Customs


Gifts should always be nicely wrapped.
Birthdays and Catholic holidays are the most popular gift-giving occasions.
Gifts may be given at baby showers but even more so at baptisms or christenings.
Common baptism gifts include religious memorabilia, photo albums or money.
Italians are generous gift-givers and appreciate well-known and respected brand names when offering or receiving gifts.
Black and gold should be avoided as gift-wrapping colours, as they are reserved for mourning.
Purple is considered bad luck and should be avoided when choosing gift wrap or packaging.
Italians never give chrysanthemums as a gift, because they are traditionally reserved for bringing to funerals or cemeteries.

Customs


Always wrap a gift and put it in a bag, to be less conspicuous before giving it.
Do not wrap a gift or package in white coloured paper.
Gifts should be offered in private, as doing so in public may be embarrassing for the recipient, or others may become jealous.
Gifts should be offered with both hands.
In Japanese society, it is polite to turn down a gift once or twice before accepting it.
Do not give any gift in 4s or 9s (4 has a very close connotation with death, and 9 is unlucky).
The colour white, along with white flowers (especially lilies) represent mourning.
Gift-givers typically avoid jewellery and house decorations, or anything the recipient may feel obliged to wear/display.

Customs


Gift-giving in Mexico symbolises affection and appreciation, and not giving gifts on some occasions may be perceived as a deliberately discourteous act.
When invited into a home, the etiquette in Mexico is to bring a gift. Flowers are the best gift; alternatives include wine, gourmet sweets and cakes.
White flowers are the best for gift-giving as they are considered uplifting.
If your hosts have children, it is thoughtful to offer a gift such as a small toy that cannot be purchased within Mexico, or sports team clothing from your home country.
There are no particular rules in regards to gift wrapping.
A birthday custom in Mexico for children is to have a piñata at their celebration. The piñata is filled with sweets and small toys, then it is hung from the ceiling or a tree to be hit with a stick until it breaks.
Celebrated throughout Latin America and Latino communities in the United States, the Quinceanera is celebrated by young women on their 15th birthday. This celebration is an important rite of passage which represents the transition from girlhood to womanhood. The celebration typically includes a mass and is usually followed by a party.
Business gift-giving in Mexico is not usually required, but it is appreciated and viewed as a gesture of good will.
Traditionally expensive gifts are not appropriate unless you have established a close friendship.
Red flowers can carry negative connotations and are believed to cast spells.
Purple flowers are associated with funerals.
One should be cautious when giving silver, as Mexicans are one of the world’s top producers and exporters of silver and therefore take a lot of pride in silver products.

Customs


Gifts are not traded casually, and gift-giving occurs in close, personal relationships.
General gifts often include books, art objects, wine or liquor.
Knives should never be given as a gift.
Ostentatious or lavish gifts are considered embarrassing and unnecessary.

Customs


Gifts are typically opened upon reception.
It is polite to offer a gift to the hostess when invited to a dinner party. The most common gifts are flowers, desserts or a bottle of wine.
Lavish or expensive gifts are seen as excessive in Polish culture, unless it is for a very close relation or a truly special occasion.
Flowers should not be offered in odd numbers.
One should avoid offering red or white flowers, especially carnations and lilies.
Yellow chrysanthemums are associated with funerals.

Customs


Because Russians celebrate four winter holidays, small gifts or tokens of appreciation are common – extravagant, expensive gifts should be reserved for family.
Some Russians consider giving watches as gifts to be a sign of separation or farewell.
Chocolates or flowers are not appropriate gifts for a Russian man.
Gifts such as jewellery or watches are not suitable for a Russian woman unless it is a romantic gift. Women prefer to select these gifts for themselves. The same is true for make-up and cosmetics.
Many Russians consider giving sharp objects, like knives or scissors, to be taboo.
It is taboo to give a wallet as a present without a token amount of money inside.
Yellow flowers should not be given as they can signify illness or separation.
Do not give a Russian man chocolates or flowers. Typical gifts to give to Russian men are nice bottles of hard alcohol, cufflinks, ties and techy accessories like styluses for smartphones and tablets, phone cases or headphones.

Customs


When invited to someone's home, you should bring a small, wrapped gift for the hostess such as chocolates, dessert items such as pastries or a bottle of high-quality wine.
Gifts should be opened immediately in the presence of a host.
Flowers are only sent for special celebrations. You should always give flowers in odd numbers (except for 13).
When purchasing flowers, you should give something bright and colourful (red roses connote passion; yellow roses, infidelity).
Recommended food or gifts include pastries, cakes, chocolates, champagne and fruit baskets.
When giving flowers, you should not offer chrysanthemums, dahlias or white lilies.
You should not give anything associated with the number 13 (considered an unlucky number).
High quality gifts (something branded) are acceptable, but anything too extravagant may be considered a bribe.

Customs


Gifts are opened when received.
During the holiday season, boxes of chocolate are popular gifts.
When doing business in Sweden, it’s recommended that you don’t offer gifts to those who you are doing business with.

Customs


Ideally, gifts are wrapped in red paper for happy occasions, as red is a lucky colour.
Gifts should be wrapped with great care. The wrapping can be as important as the gift.
Gifts should be given and received with two hands.
Gifts should be refused once or twice before being accepted.
The following gifts are associated with funerals: gift wrap in white, black or blue; clocks; towels; handkerchiefs; straw sandals.
Do not give a gift in sets of four (in Taiwanese, the word for “four” sounds very much like the word for “death”).
Do not give scissors, knives or other cutting utensils as they indicate that you want to sever the relationship.
Opening gifts hastily or in public view is considered impolite.

Customs


Any colour is acceptable for gift wrap as long as the gift is nicely wrapped.
Gifts can be presented in public but will usually be opened in private.
Desserts and flowers (especially roses and carnations) are popular Turkish gifts.
It is polite to offer a gift to the hostess when invited to a dinner party. The most common gifts are desserts and candles.
Weddings are arguably the biggest gift-giving occasion in Turkish culture. Traditionally, the bride and groom are given gifts of gold coins.
Baby gifts are very common and are usually clothes and money.
As Turkey’s culture is primarily Islamist, gifts of alcohol may not be a good choice.
As Turkey is a Muslim country, the vast majority of the population does not recognise Christmas.

Customs


Gift giving is not a usual part of British business etiquette, although reciprocation is good practice when gifts are received
However, the British do exchange gifts between family members and close friends for birthdays and Christmas.
The gift doesn't need to be expensive, but it should try to be something related to the recipient's interests.
Corporate gifts are typically not exchanged in the UK business culture. However, for business social events, small gifts are generally appropriate, such as a gift from your home country.
If you're invited to someone's home, flowers, chocolate, cheese or wines make good gifts.

Customs


A gift can be as simple as a card and personal note. Gifts become more elaborate for someone you are close to.
Gift-giving is not an elaborate event, except at Christmas or birthdays.
When invited to someone's home for dinner, it's polite to bring a small box of good chocolates, a bottle of wine, a pot plant or flowers for the hostess.
Gifts are normally opened when received.
Gifts from your home country will always be appreciated. Good choices are local and regional arts and crafts, books, confectionary, speciality foods and wine or spirits (if it is certain that the recipient drinks alcohol).
Many companies have policies that discourage their employees from giving or receiving gifts. Most government employees are not allowed to accept gifts. No offence should be taken if someone cannot accept a gift.
The number 13 is considered unlucky.
You shouldn't leave the price tag on gifts, but gift receipts are frequently included.

6 areas to consider when selling overseas H

1

Plan your entry

2

Accept payments

3

Shipping Services

4

Taxes, laws and regulations

5

Setting up your in-country presence

6

Local customer service